Afghan women traders are also pushed into segregation by the Taliban

The decision of the Taliban to segregate the merchants supposes a new deprivation for the rights of the Afghans (REUTERS / Zohra Bensemra) (ZOHRA BENSEMRA /)

Adila She is one more shopkeeper in a market that brings together businesses run by both women and men in the city of Mazar-e-Sharif, in the north of Afghanistana model at risk of disappearing under pressure from the Taliban to segregate Afghans now also in the markets.

“The Ministry of Propagation of Vice and Virtue asked us a week ago to consider the hijab and also, if possible, change location to Rabia Balkhi women’s market”, he reported this Wednesday to the news agency EFE Adila, where she sells cosmetics and clothing.

A future destination that does not completely convince the Afghan, who complained that the market for women is in decline due to a mixture of government negligence and lack of advertising, exacerbating the already fragile situation of many merchants for whom buying and selling is their only form of economic support.

Adila’s store is one more in the local market, where numerous merchants also work and, according to what he told EFE the spokesman for the Ministry of Virtue, Mohammad Sadiq Akif Mahajirestablishments run by women may remain open “until the Government finds a specific area for their work.”

The Taliban’s decision to segregate the merchants It represents a new deprivation for the rights of Afghans, which have been severely curtailed since the rise of fundamentalists to power in August 2021.

Apart from this series of orders directed at Afghans, the Taliban vetoed last month that women work in non-governmental organizations (REUTERS / Jorge Silva)
Apart from this series of orders directed at Afghans, the Taliban vetoed last month that women work in non-governmental organizations (REUTERS / Jorge Silva) (JORGE SILVA /)

In addition to limiting their access to work, barring their access to secondary and higher education, and imposing mandatory veiling, the Taliban’s interim regime has decreed numerous restrictions that increasingly confine Afghans in their homes.

A reality that is increasingly similar to the time of the first fundamentalist regime between 1996 and 2001, when, according to a rigid interpretation of Islam and its strict social code known as Pashtunwali, Banned female attendance at schools and confined the women in the home.

Apart from this series of orders directed at the Afghans, the Taliban last month they banned women from working in non-governmental organizationsunder the pretext that many of the employees did not wear the veil.

A decision that was condemned by the international community, and which led several of the NGOs to suspend their programs in Afghanistan, while the UN came to warn that, if there were no changes in the regulations, they would be forced to stop many activities in the country.

(With information from EFE)

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Source-www.infobae.com