In addition to weapons, Ukraine also awaits the arrival of prostheses for war-wounded

A worker makes prostheses for amputee patients in Dnipro, a city in southeastern Ukraine where many of the wounded on the front lines arrive. The Ukrainian military repeat that they need other countries to send them weapons, but in the case of the prosthetic plant at the Dnipro maimed rehabilitation center, what they expect are prosthetics, since now it has more than twice as many patients as before the war. EFE/Esteban Biba (Esteban Biba/)

The Ukrainian military repeat that they need other countries to send them weapons, but in the case of the mutilated rehabilitation center in Dnipro, what they expect are prosthetics, since now it has more than twice as many patients as before the war.

”Before we received between 70 and 80 a month. Now up to 200 or 250, with a significant upward trend “Oleksiy Shtanko, director of the Dnipro Prosthetic Plant, a city in southeastern Ukraine where many of the wounded on the front arrive, assures Efe.

Foreign aid is essential “in these difficult times”he stresses, as he watches a couple of patients doing exercises to learn to walk with their prosthetic legs.

OUTSIDE HELP

Everything comes to the center, from small children to the elderly, with minor and more serious mutilations, but they have prostheses for all of them, from those that are requested for aesthetic reasons to more complex ones with artificial intelligence.

ukraine prosthesis for mutilated
The center needs an expansion and money is needed, or the sending of any material, from beds to orthopedic machinery, to receive more wounded soldiers and also civilians, to help “a greater number of people,” he adds. EFE/Esteban Biba (Esteban Biba/)

Anyone can go after requesting it through a public Social Protection service, to receive free assistance, both to make the prosthesis and for their stay during rehabilitation.

They receive aid, “but I would like to see more, given the number of requests we receive now,” he confesses.

The center needs an expansion and money is needed, or the sending of any material, from beds to orthopedic machinery, to receive more wounded soldiers and also civilians, to help “a greater number of people,” he adds.

The war has forced them to speed up their work, because before it took them a couple of months to make each prosthesis, tailored to each patient, and now it only takes one.

ukraine prosthesis for mutilated
Ivan undergoes therapy to adapt to his prosthesis at the maimed rehabilitation center in Dnipro, a city in southeastern Ukraine where many of the wounded on the front arrive. EFE/Esteban Biba (Esteban Biba/)

Before, amputations were due to causes such as work accidents or traffic accidents, now many more are due to war woundsExplain.

Shtanko points out that the lower costs, for example in salaries, mean that a prosthesis in this center is three times cheaper than what it can cost in other European countries, where it can exceed 10,520 dollars.

With that money here they have for three, counting the entire process from manufacturing to completing the rehabilitation, which in the case of the legs “is fast, in three or five days you learn to walk again,” he says.

But for him, what matters more than the money is the result, that whoever comes to them leaves satisfied.

ukraine prosthesis for mutilated
With that money here they have three, counting the entire process from manufacturing to completing the rehabilitation, which in the case of the legs “is fast, in three or five days you learn to walk again.” EFE/Esteban Biba (Esteban Biba/)

NEW LEGS AND HANDS

Olexandr is all smiles after showing off his skill playing table tennis with his physical therapist. Her racket is duct-taped to her fingerless hand.

He lost them a few years ago, along with his legs, after they froze when he was left outdoors one winter day after receiving a beating, he tells Efe.

He has been in rehabilitation since he was 17 years old, with “training for everything, but they just saw it, here I even learned to play table tennis,” he says without losing his smile.

When he has his prostheses for his hands, he hopes that in two months he will have learned to live with them, just as he already manages with his legs.

ukraine prosthesis for mutilated
Olexandr undergoes therapy to adapt to his prosthesis at the mutilated rehabilitation center in Dnipro, a city in southeastern Ukraine where many of the wounded on the front arrive. EFE/Esteban Biba (Esteban Biba/)

The center is preparing for the arrival of soldiers and also civilians with mutilations during the war, so that they can begin their rehabilitation while now they are preparing their prostheses, each one manually, custom-made and with the name of each person who is waiting for them.”

“Personalized even in the color of your skin, even your nails,” says an employee while showing a plastic arm.

They have also prepared a room for children, a kitchen where patients learn to live with their new hands to resume their lives, how to open a door or put a light bulb.

But they need bars that can be adapted to the height of each patient who has to learn to walk again, since the ones they have now are fixed.

ukraine prosthesis for mutilated
The center is preparing for the arrival of soldiers and also civilians with mutilations during the war, so that they can begin their rehabilitation while now they are preparing their prostheses, each one manually, custom-made and with the name of each person who is waiting for them.” EFE/Esteban Biba (Esteban Biba/)

Iván, a 77-year-old man whose legs were amputated after a thrombosis; Volodimir, 42, who lost one of them in a fire in his house; or Olexandr, 49, who had his hair cut due to gangrene, trust that help will arrive, as they wait in the room they share in the center.

They will be joined by those who arrive when their prosthetics are ready to replace legs and arms lost due to the war.

(with information from EFE)

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Source-www.infobae.com