In Egypt they discover an entire Roman city near Luxor

The archaeological finding was made on the banks of the Nile; metallurgical workshops and different types of Roman coins were found

On Tuesday (local time) Egypt announced the discovery in Luxor of the remains of an “entire Roman city” dating from the first centuries of the Christian era.

According to the Ministry of Antiquities, it is “an entire residential city” from the second and third centuries, discovered “on the banks of the Nile, near the temple of Luxor”, about 500 kilometers south of Cairo.

Egypt announced the discovery in Luxor of the remains of an “entire Roman city” dating from the first centuries of the Christian era.

According to the Ministry of Antiquities, it is “an entire residential city” from the second and third centuries, discovered “on the banks of the Nile, near the temple of Luxor”, about 500 kilometers south of Cairo.

Egypt has revealed in recent months several important discoveries, mainly in the Saqara necropolis, south of Cairo.

In January he also announced that a tomb had been found in Luxor, likely belonging to an 18th-dynasty royal wife, that of Akhenaten and Tutankhamun, dating back 3,500 years.

For some experts, these claims have more of a political and economic aspect than a scientific one. The government wants to attract 30 million tourists a year by 2028, up from 13 million who traveled before the pandemic.

The country, with 104 million inhabitants and in the midst of a serious economic crisis, is counting on these announcements to reactivate tourism, hit hard by the covid-19 pandemic.

This sector, which employs two million people and generates more than 10 percent of GDP, has been in decline since the Arab Spring in 2011.