She was unconscious for 5 hours and woke up with “dozens of bruises”: a medalist reported that she was drugged on the last night of the World Swimming Championships

The young Canadian swimmer Mary-Sophie Harvey can never forget the FINA World Championships (International Swimming Federation) held in Budapest (Hungary) between June 17 and July 3.

This event will remain marked in the memory of the 22-year-old medalist, not for having won the bronze medal in the 4×200-meter freestyle, but for the ordeal he experienced during the last night before returning to his country.

Through his Instagram account, Harvey revealed that she was drugged and can’t remember what happened in a window of four to six hours later. What she does know is that she woke up with “a dozen bruises” on her body.

A swimmer was drugged after the World Cup final

“I have debated for a while whether or not I should post anything. But I have always been transparent with you and these situations unfortunately happen too many times for me to remain silent”, wrote the member of the Canadian delegation that traveled to Tokyo 2020 along with the eight slides in which she developed the ordeal she suffered.

“On the last night of the World Championships I was drugged. At that time I was not aware of what was inside, I only remember that I woke up the next morning completely lost; with our team manager and doctor at my bedside. I remember having my competition, but afterwards, I don’t remember anything. There’s a four to six hour window where I don’t remember anything. I have heard fragments from people and I have also experienced trials, ”she recounted without specifying or confirming the place where she regained consciousness.

The next day, the athlete was back at home and having dinner with her family: “I remember my mother told me: ‘You look different.’ She didn’t know that I felt that way too. She felt that the body she was in was not mine (I still feel that way). I came home and I found a dozen bruises on my body. Some of my friends told me afterwards that they had to take care of me while I was unconscious and that probably explained why. That didn’t make me feel any better,” she continued.

A swimmer was drugged after the World Cup final
Mary-Sophie Harvey, in training

Later, the young woman said that she went to a hospital where she was treated by doctors and psychologists to undergo various tests: “They told me that it happens more often than we think and that, in a way, I was lucky to get out of this with a rib sprain and a minor concussion.”

“Whoever reads this, please be careful”, warned Harvey and added: “I thought I was safe, that it would never happen to me, especially being surrounded by friends. But it happened to me, and I wish someone had informed me about it before that night.

“It still scares me to think about the unknowns of that night,” the Canadian lamented, in addition to feeling ashamed of what she experienced.

A swimmer was drugged after the World Cup final
The image of his participation in the last Olympic Games

THE FULL DOWNLOAD

The last night of the World Championships I was drugged.

At that time I was not aware of what got inside me, I only remember that I woke up the next morning completely lost; with our team manager and doctor at my bedside. I remember celebrating my competition, but also being reasonable and aware of my next goal, which is the Commonwealth Games. But then I don’t remember anything. There’s a four to six hour window where I don’t remember anything. I’ve heard bits and pieces from people and I’ve also experienced judgment.

All I can say is this: I have never felt more ashamed.

The next day, I traveled back home and had dinner with my family. I remember my mother saying to me, “You look different.” She didn’t know that I felt that way too. She felt that the body she was in was not mine (I still feel that way). I got home to find a dozen bruises on my body. Some of my friends told me afterwards that they had to take care of me while I was unconscious and that probably explained why. That didn’t make me feel any better.

I called one of my best friends, knowing that her mother is a doctor, to get some guidance. I ended up going to the hospital, where I was treated by doctors and psychologists. They tested me and treated me the best they could. I was told it happens more often [de lo que] we thought and that, in a way, I was lucky to come out of this with a sprained rib and a minor concussion.

It helped heal some of the fears I had, but sadly not all of them.

Unfortunately, these events happen more than we think. An increasing number of dangerous cases have been recorded over the years, but they are still not talked about enough. Resources for victims remain hard to find, and the judgment of outsiders remains very much in evidence. Whoever reads this, please be careful. I thought I was safe, that it would never happen to me, especially being surrounded by friends. But it happened to me… and I wish someone had told me about it before that night.

It still scares me to think about the unknowns of that night. I am still trying to find the ‘happy Mary’ that she found happiness before this event. I’m still, in a way, ashamed of what happened, and I think I always will be…

But I will not let this event define me.

Thank you to the people who helped me while I was vulnerable and to those who have reached out to me ever since. I apologize to everyone who has tried to contact me or seen me but felt something was wrong. I’m still learning to deal with it all and to find myself again. Thank you for your understanding, Mary.

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Source-www.infobae.com