Sting asks to defend “human capital” against artificial intelligence

  • Sting predicted a “battle” of artists to defend their works, in an interview with the BBC in which he called for caution in the face of this new technology

British musician Sting warned against songs written by artificial intelligence on Thursday and predicted a “battle” by artists to defend their works, in an interview with the BBC in which he called for caution in the face of this new technology.

“The building blocks of music belong to us, human beings,” said the 71-year-old former Police singer.

“That is going to be a battle that we will all have to fight in the next two years: defending our human capital against AI,” he warned.

The use of artificial intelligence in composition is the subject of debate in the music industry, where some denounce copyright infringement while others praise its advantages.

This technology was used to imitate Canadian singers Drake and The Weeknd in a song released last month under the title Heart On My Sleeve.

The song was briefly available on music streaming platforms before being withdrawn following a copyright complaint by Universal Music Group, which publishes both artists through a subsidiary.

Sting, whose real name is Gordon Sumner, rose to fame with The Police in the late 1970s and early 1980s with hits like Roxanne, Message in a Bottle and Walking on the Moon.