Vladimir Putin formally registered as a candidate to be elected for the fifth time as president of Russia

The president of Russia, Vladimir Putin. Europa Press/Contact/Artem Priakhin (Europa Press/Contact/Artem Pria/)

Russian President Vladimir Putin has been registered as a candidate for the presidential elections on March 17, in which he will run for re-election for a fifth six-year term at the head of the Kremlin, the Central Election Commission (CEC) announced today.

The decision adopted by the CEC indicates that on January 29 at 11 hours and 23 minutes, Vladimir Putin, born in 1952, was registered as a candidate for the position of president of the Russian Federation.

The electoral commission specified that it had only detected 0.15% of invalid signatures (91) – the maximum allowed is 5% – among the 60,000 analyzed.

Putin’s team reported days ago that it had collected more than two million signatures, although the opposition to the Kremlin questioned this, since, they claim, no one has seen queues in front of the presidential administration headquarters throughout the country.

File image of a woman voting at a polling station during local elections in Donetsk, Ukraine, controlled by Russia, on September 9, 2023. EFE/EPA/STRINGER
File image of a woman voting at a polling station during local elections in Donetsk, Ukraine, controlled by Russia, on September 9, 2023. EFE/EPA/STRINGER (STRINGER/)

The current Russian leader, who has led this country since 2000 -with a four-year hiatus as prime minister (2008-12)- runs as an independent candidatebut has received support from the Kremlin’s United Russia party, which controls both houses of the Russian Parliament.

Although he publicly assured that he would not do so, Putin reformed the Constitution in 2020 to be able to run for re-election, something he will be able to do again in six years and, in this way, remain in the Kremlin until 2036.

Putin, 71 years old and whose management is approved by 80% of Russians, according to official polls, should win the elections with more votes than in 2018, when he received more than 76% of the votes.

The CEC had so far registered three candidates: the communist Nikolai Kharitonov, the ultranationalist Leonid Slutski and the representative of New People, Vladislav Davankov.

Boris Nadezhdin, a Russian liberal politician, candidate for the March 17 presidential election in Russia, in an interview with The Associated Press in Moscow, January 24, 2024. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)
Boris Nadezhdin, a Russian liberal politician, candidate for the March 17 presidential election in Russia, in an interview with The Associated Press in Moscow, on January 24, 2024. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko) (Alexander Zemlianichenko/)

The only candidate opposed to the Russian military campaign in Ukraine with a chance of achieving registration is the liberal Boris Nadezhdin, who has received the support of the opposition in prison and in exile.

Nadezhdin, who needs 100,000 signatures to be able to compete in the presidential elections, now has more than 200,000, which will be presented on January 31, the last day of the deadline, according to its website.

“If they suddenly decide not to allow my participation in the elections, we will launch Plan B,” the opponent announced in a meeting with his followers in Moscow, whose images were broadcast by independent Russian media.

The presentation of the signatures to the CEC is expected to take place on Wednesday, January 31, after which the authorities will have ten days to issue their verdict on the politician’s candidacy, supported by many Russian opponents, including the team of imprisoned Alexei Navalny, whose wife, Yulia, also signed in favor of Nadezhdin’s participation in the presidential race.

Russian citizens sign in support of Boris Nadezhdin, the presidential candidate of the Civic Initiative Party, at his campaign headquarters in Moscow, on January 25, 2024. EFE/EPA/YURI KOCHETKOV
Russian citizens sign in support of Boris Nadezhdin, the presidential candidate of the Civic Initiative Party, at his campaign headquarters in Moscow, on January 25, 2024. EFE/EPA/YURI KOCHETKOV (YURI KOCHETKOV/)

Nadezhdin describes the war in Ukraine as a “fatal mistake” and assures that he wants to become president so that Russia is “great, peaceful and free.”

However, analysts are pessimistic, since at the time the Kremlin informed the independent press that it would not allow a candidate who advocates for peace to participate in the elections.

(with information from EFE)

Source-www.infobae.com